Easy management: All marketing tools and affiliate links are provided by the merchant. You never have to bother creating banners, links and all that. You only have to use what has been provided by the merchant. Also, you do not have to handle orders, ship any inventory, or deal with the customer. The merchant handles all that, so you are only focused on promoting the offers to your audience.

The thing about affiliate marketing is that you don’t have to monitor it the whole time, yet it can still generate income. You can optimize your strategies and work on your marketing methods during your free time, so it doesn’t have to get in the way of your studies. It’s like having a source of income in a setup and schedule that best works for you. That is one of the reasons why affiliate marketing is such a good money-making opportunity for students!
Leanne, that was great stuff. I saw some interesting delineators I’d never seen before, like how many subscribers you have making a difference in whether you should start with affiliates, at what level, etc. I appreciate the “ethical” angle you weaved throughout this, too, because affiliate marketing can/does have a bad reputation due to the way it’s been abused in the past. Your article will help educate current and future affiliate marketers, much appreciated!

Wow! Thank you for such a complete description of affiliate marketing. I just started casually blogging a few months ago and your post gives me a great view into just how much work is involved if I’m going to successfully monetize my blog. I just shared a short post titled “A Blogger’s Nightmare – 0 Active Users” commenting on having blog traffic…I definitely see that there’s a lot more involved! Thanks again.
Though it’s great to have a niche you are knowledgeable in and have a product you can love and back 100% that’s only have the battle. For anyone to ever be made aware that you product even exists you have to know where to send the word out. I am 20 years old and my story sucks because just starting out in this game I have spent less than most people have in years trying to figure it out, but not anymore. I am finally learning, spent my last investment of a $1.00 and come success or failure I am posting every day on my blog for all to track and follow or even to compete against me to drive my ambition to do even better.

ps. collecting these Facebook polls is one of the main reasons I was able to get so many SiteGround sales. Yes, I’m suggesting SiteGround for your host, but this is also a strategy that can be used to collect unbiased reviews. Just go to Facebook and search “SiteGround poll” and you can dig up some great stuff – you can do this with lots of affiliate products/companies.
Many Affiliate Marketers recommend building an email list to market your affiliate links.  I’m all for building an email list, but not for the sole purpose of promoting my links.  I want to caution you with your email marketing strategy and use it carefully and wisely.  People will subscribe to your list if you offer quality content, but if you only use your list to continuously promote your product links, be prepared to lose subscribers.

ZacJohnson.com – Zac Johnson’s blog contains more than 1,000 articles based on real-life experiences that exemplify lessons from the affiliate marketing industry. In recent posts, he gives tips on staying relevant, transitioning with a changing market to maintain a steady income flow and being successful in the travel marketing niche. Johnson’s blog also contains links to his recommended resources for marketers.
Long-Tail Keywords – specific keywords usually with 3-7 individual words in a phrase. They are highly targeted and MUCH easier to rank for than broad keywords (all mine are long-tail). The lower your domain authority (check using OSE), the less competitive (more long-tail) your keywords should be. If you can get more specific and the keyword still shows up in Google Autocomplete, Moz Keyword Explorer and other keyword tools… choose the SPECIFIC one.
CharlesNgo.com – Charles Ngo, a well-known and respected Internet marketer, shares affiliate marketing strategies that help people work smarter, not harder. His blog posts cover how to launch an affiliate marketing campaign, why offers aren’t converting, how to get things done in a distracted world and much more. He suggests the best books to read on the subject and provides his own advanced training called the AFFcelerator Program.
Thirsty Affiliates tracks, cloaks, and categorizes your affiliate links. Once you’ve signed up for your program(s) grab your affiliate links and add them to this plugin. This can take time if you will be linking to multiple pages on your affiliate’s website (which in many cases, you should). The pro version comes with statistics but I don’t even use it and I’m quite the analytical person.
Do you have zero interest in an expensive mountain bike the company you are an affiliate of sells? Well, you probably don’t want to feature it on your blog, as it is extremely difficult to persuade readers (or anyone for that matter) that they should buy something you wouldn’t be caught spending a single penny on. When you are passionate about a product or–at the very least–interested in learning more about it, this will come through to your readers, engage them and better coax them to buy

Great article as it gets me thinking about the various ways to monetize my sites. With that said, my biggest hurdle has been how to get started building traffic. You see articles all over the net talking about massive traffic techniques, but I’ve never really found a guide for a fresh blog/website and how to get to their first 100, 500, or 1,000 daily uniques. Of course writing consistent quality content is key, but writing alone an audience does not make. Any tips or articles to point us to? Thanks again Sean!
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