It's amazing to think that just by simply offering free reports to skeptical e-mail subscribers on your blog or website to build your email list and promoting products as an affiliate can lead to thousands of dollars in sales later on, either through a lifetime of small purchases (e.g. e-books, study guides), the occasional purchase of a complete package, or permission to access a continuity program (a paid monthly subscription to a website, coaching program, etc.) of some sort.
I loved the landing page idea. This would be very effective in one case ONLY. If you are promoting a product or a an eBook this would work very fine OR increasing an Email list by offering something for FREE. You know in this life “Nothing is for FREE”. So you are giving your visitor for an example “A guide to how to install a blog template in wordpress or blogger” or “how to monetize your blog?” a FREE guide will drive this visitor to type his email and hit the subscribe button right away. But if the visitor a PayPal Button he just click the MAGIC X button on the top of his browser. Landing pages are very effective when you know how to use them.
Depending on the network, you may also need to pay setup costs. This covers the cost of integrating you to the network and testing tracking etc. Start-up fees can range from nothing to over $5,000. I have been asked for $30,000 before and, obviously, I never started with that network. This cost is often negotiable when you discuss contracts with the network, but it is worth noting when considering the start-up costs.

Many Affiliate Marketers recommend building an email list to market your affiliate links.  I’m all for building an email list, but not for the sole purpose of promoting my links.  I want to caution you with your email marketing strategy and use it carefully and wisely.  People will subscribe to your list if you offer quality content, but if you only use your list to continuously promote your product links, be prepared to lose subscribers.


If you write honest reviews, you will get something that SEO can’t provide, good word-of-mouth. Having good recommendations passed from friend to friend is important for every product, but it can really make or break a niche site. If you pick your niche well and create a reliable site that is full of good information, then you can be sure that the first people to come across your site will spread the word to their friends. The word-of-mouth effect is great because it compounds. In other words, one friend tells two friends and then those two each tell two more and so forth. The pattern continues until you saturate the market and become king of the niche.
But I think the biggest deciding factor in this, goes back to the site as a whole and all of the other posts. Are the genuine? Is the blogger constantly trying to push products? I’d like to think I’ve been doing this long enough that my audience knows I’m not out to make a quick buck – and I think even relatively new bloggers can prove this based on their other content.
×