Cookie period is the time wherein affiliates can still be credited for commissions. It is set by the affiliate network. The browser cookie links a sale to you whenever your site visitor clicks on a particular affiliate link and makes a purchase. The cookie period refers to the time they reach the destination website to the actual time they purchased something from the store.
If you get THAT clear and believe in some product, go ahead. Your audience trusts your word. But most folks need to use or experience before they can get clear, because they have a fear: the fear of using trust. I am slowly losing that fear but still use what I promote, before I promote it. I also just sell my stuff mainly. Since I have quite a few products and eBooks and services to sell.
1. Is there nowhere to promote it within USA? The US is going to bring the lions share of traffic for most products so I’d prioritize promoting to them above anything. If you prefer the Canadian network because the payouts are higher/you have a relationship with them/whatever then you can Geo target your affiliate link. That will send Canadian traffic to your CA link and American traffic to your US link.
Michael, great article–lots of good solid ideas to get my affiliate (& my rear end), up and at it!! Also, love those falafels too! I am in the process of building a website that will have approximately 8-10 products offered over time. The products all come from the same niche. Do you think this type of site can have good success as well, or do you think just focusing on one product per website is the way to go?
While your site is still new, it's a good idea to start capitalizing on someone else's audience. Continue focusing on building your own content, but also considering writing content for a few big, high-traffic blogs that are relevant for your niche. By writing content for a bigger site, you are able to get in front of another audience and showcase your expertise on a particular topic. This will eventually lead to more traffic to your site, as well. 
The best way to market your affiliate website is actually free! You want to rank highly in search results where people will find your site and visit at no cost. Preferably, these visitors will be highly targeted and “ready to buy” visitors that you can refer to earn commissions. The best way to promote your site in search engines is to use something called SEO, which stands for Search Engine Optimization. However, you shouldn’t just rely on search engines to bring you traffic. There are tons of ways to diversify traffic sources and while search engines are probably the best, other methods work well, too. The most popular is through social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest, but you can also look into things like Google Adwords and the Yahoo Bing Network located at Media.net. While paid advertising can be a bit risky and expensive, a working paid advertising campaign can make you a ton of money. In order to sell the affiliated products, you need to have readers one way or another. Attracting readers requires a lot of dedication and is as important as creating high quality content. My highest recommended way to achieve a huge number of website visitors over time is to use the CTPM process.
I always add an HTML table of contents to posts to make sure they are long and structured. This has been a HUGE help for me (and my readers) and there are tons of benefits: better chance of getting “jump to links” in Google (see below), increased average time on page, decreased bounce rates, and it makes it easier for readers to navigate through your content.
Great article as it gets me thinking about the various ways to monetize my sites. With that said, my biggest hurdle has been how to get started building traffic. You see articles all over the net talking about massive traffic techniques, but I’ve never really found a guide for a fresh blog/website and how to get to their first 100, 500, or 1,000 daily uniques. Of course writing consistent quality content is key, but writing alone an audience does not make. Any tips or articles to point us to? Thanks again Sean!
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