Making money with affiliate marketing requires work. There was once a time, when the web was new and even a relatively poor site could garner a lot of traffic, that affiliate marketing was as easy as just signing up. Those days are gone now and competition is stiff. Making money with affiliate marketing requires hard work, especially at the beginning, but the good news is that money can still be made online and it you can get up and running quickly. Here are some ways to ensure that you start making money right out of the gate.


Use Deep Links – these are pages on your affiliate’s website that AREN’T the homepage. For SiteGround’s hosting I link a lot to their speed technology page as an affiliate link. If you’re doing Amazon’s affiliate program you just want to gather a list of products you will be recommending to readers, create an affiliate link for each one, and import them to the plugin.
Of particular interest to infopreneurs on the internet are digital information products, information products that are sold in digital format of some sort. As opposed to hardcover or softcover books, CDs, manuals or reports, an infopreneur can deliver these items as PDF files, audio files, streaming video and other emerging media. This substantially reduces delivery and transportation costs for businesses and gives customers immediate access to highly coveted information.
These days, you have the best programmers in the world creating what are called Content Management Systems (CMS) that will build awesome looking websites for FREE. For example, this website is based on the WordPress platform. I did pay about $50 for a premium design, but other than that, I don’t have to know any computer code at all and either do you.
Create custom alerts on your phone for affiliate sales – if you use GMail, go to your settings and create a filter so all emails with “SiteGround Affiliate Sale Generated” in the subject line go into their own folder (tweak the subject line to match whatever email notification your affiliate sends you). Then setup a custom alert on your phone using the GMail app so anytime you generate a sale, you get a custom alert (here’s a tutorial for Android and here’s one for Apple). I have different notifications for SiteGround, StudioPress Themes, etc. Makes your day better :)

Hey guys. Great post with detailed, actionable content. I would like to add my ‘2 cents’ if that’s ok. You are absolutely right with offering a ‘free gift’ in exchange for someone’s name and email address but I have found short reports have worked best for me. If you give away too much information for free they don’t tend to get consumed so the trust isn’t built with your subscriber. Your free gift is the first point of contact with your prospect so it’s unlikely they will read an entire ebook but if you give them a short report which they are able to consume in about 20 mins and they get tremendous value from they are more likely to listen to you in the future and buy your recommendations. A big mistake i see a lot of affiliates make is the content they use for their free giveaway. They think just because it’s given away for free that they can just throw together some PLR material and use that. Unfortunately that doesn’t cut it these days and will damage your relationship with your prospect rather than strengthen it. The best way is to carry out some research in your marketplace and see what pains and frustrations your prospects have and create your free giveaway around that.
Adam Riemer Marketing – Adam Reimer’s blog is easy to navigate and full of fresh ideas about affiliate program management, blogging, adware, monetizing your website and mobile advertising.  After more than a decade of working in online marketing, Reimer writes, he started the blog to respond to questions he receives regularly from affiliates, search engine marketing professionals and bloggers. He has published an ebook titled “How to Make Money Blogging” that is available via his blog.

But I think the biggest deciding factor in this, goes back to the site as a whole and all of the other posts. Are the genuine? Is the blogger constantly trying to push products? I’d like to think I’ve been doing this long enough that my audience knows I’m not out to make a quick buck – and I think even relatively new bloggers can prove this based on their other content.
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